Travel | online-english-lessons.eu

1. To set off is to start a journey.

Examples of use:

a) What time are we setting off?

b) They set off for home.

c) There are roadworks on the motorway so you’d better set off early.

d) He set off from Paris last Sunday.

e) We set off for London with only £20 in our pockets.

f) I’m looking forward to setting off on my summer holiday.

2. To set off something (or set something off) is to cause something to start or happen.

Examples of use:

a) The loud music set off the baby’s crying.

b) The proposed wage cuts set off a work-to-rule.

c) He came home with lipstick on his collar and this set off a huge argument.

d) News headline: Nick Clegg is about to set off an almight row over universities.

3. To set off something (or set something off) is to cause something to explode or start to ring loudly.

Examples of use:

a) The smoke from the fire set off the smoke alarm.

b) They set a bomb off outside the building.

c) A spark set off the fireworks.

infinitive
set off
present simple
set off and sets off
-ing form
setting off
past simple
set off
past participle
set off

Can you write a sentence using set off?

Have you set off on a journey recently?

Have you ever set off fireworks, or a fire alarm?

Image © Drew Coffman

No comments