50 common English phrasal verbs

This free article (also downloadable as a PDF) has fifty frequently used English phrasal verbs, with definitions and over 300 example sentences showing how these phrasal verbs are used in everyday conversation.

This free PDF has fifty frequently used English phrasal verbs, with definitions and over 300 example sentences showing how these phrasal verbs are used in everyday conversation.

BELIEVE IN

  1. When you believe in something or somebody you are sure that something or somebody exists.

Examples of use:

  1. Do you believe in God?
  2. I didn’t believe in ghosts until I stayed in an old castle in Romania: now I’m certain they exist.
  3. My children still believe in fairies.
  1. To believe in something is to have a strong belief that something is good or right.

Examples of use:

  1. My grandparents believed in working hard and helping others.
  2. They do not believe in the death penalty.
  3. We believe in discipline for our children, but we don’t believe in hitting them.
  4. We don’t believe in living together before marriage.
  1. When you believe in somebody, you have confidence that they are a good trustworthy person, or that they can do something well.

Examples of use:

  1. We still believe in you.
  2. I want to believe in you, but you lied to me about everything.
  3. Don’t worry about your exams. We believe in you and we know you will do well.
  4. You can get through these problems. I believe in you.
infinitivebelieve in
present simplebelieve in and believes in
-ing formbelieving in
past simplebelieved in
past participlebelieved in

BLOW UP

  1. To blow up something (or blow something up) means to fill it with air; for example, a balloon, or a car or bicycle tyre.

Example of use:

Can you blow these balloons up for the party, please?

  1. Blow up also means to suddenly lose your temper (get very angry). Informal English.

Example of use:

  1. I broke her iPad and she blew up at me.
  2. We were having a discussion about the accounts and he suddenly blew up and stormed out.
  1. When something blows up (or when somebody blows something up) it explodes.

Examples of use:

  1. The family were injured when their house blew up because of a gas leak.
  2. Fortunately the plane was empty when the hijackers blew it up.
infinitiveblow up
present simpleblow up and blows up
-ing formblowing up
past simpleblew up
past participleblown up

BREAK DOWN

  1. If a vehicle or machine breaks down it stops working. Examples of use:
  • Our car broke down on the way to the airport and we missed our flight.
  • My washing machine has broken down.
  • Sorry I’m late. The train broke down.
  • 2. If you break down you are unable to control your feelings and you start to cry.

Examples of use:

  1. She broke down when she heard the sad news.
  2. He misses his mother very much, and he often breaks down when he talks about her.
  1. To break down is also to become mentally or physically ill because of difficult or traumatic experiences.

breakdown (noun) – a physical or mental collapse. Examples of use:

  1. Not long after her husband died she broke down and had to take some time off work.
  2. She had a nervous breakdown after her son was kidnapped.
  3. He had a breakdown last year but he’s much better now.

test

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.