Make over – English Phrasal Verb – Online English Lessons

1. To make over something or somebody (or make something or somebody over) is to give them a different or improved appearance.

If a person is made over they are given a new hairstyle and new clothes and makeup, usually by a professional stylist.

If a building or room, or a piece of furniture, is made over it is given a new and better appearance, and maybe a new use.

Examples of use:

a) We’ve just finished decorating our bedroom and we’re going to start making over our kitchen next week.

b) I’m moving to New York to start a new job and I urgently need someone to make me over before I go!

c) TV programmes that show people having their homes made over are very popular in the UK.

2. To make over something (or make something over) is to officially give possessions or money to someone so that they are the legal owner.

Examples of use:

a) He made his estate over to his nephew.

b) She made 50% of her shares over to the local cat rescue centre. 

c) His heirs were devastated when they discovered that he had already made over most of his money, and his house, to his neighbour.

makeover (noun) is a set of changes that are intended to improve someone’s or something’s appearance.

Examples of use:

1. I need a total makeover – hair, clothes, facelift, everything!

2. We gave our bedroom a makeover and it looks fantastic now.

3. Win a £5000 kitchen makeover!

4. News headline: Beyoncé shocks fans with image makeover.

infinitive make over
present simple make over and makes over
-ing form making over
past simple made over
past participle made over

Makeover shows are very popular here in the UK. Do you have them in your country? Do you like them, and do you have a favourite show?

This site had its last makeover over two years ago so it’s going to have a new look very soon!

Can you write a sentence or two using the phrasal verb ‘make over’?

You’re welcome to send your practice sentences to me, or leave them as a comment on this post – I look forward to reading them 🙂

Image © Phil Whitehouse