2011 April | online-english-lessons.eu

April 25, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

1. To sign up is to agree to do something, or to take part in something, by signing one’s name. Examples of use: a) I’ve signed up for an English language course. b) He needs a new job so he has signed up with an employment agency. c) Thousands of people signed up to take […]

April 24, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

If something that is not new is in mint condition it is perfect and as good as new. This expression has its origins in the new coins produced at the Royal Mint; where UK coins are made and distributed.   Exampes of use: 1. My copy of Charles Dickens’ book Oliver Twist is in mint […]

April 24, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

To pay up is to give someone the money that you owe them. Informal English. Examples of use: 1. You owe me £20. Come on, pay up! 2. Mr Brown was a good customer, he always paid up on time. 3. News headline: Judge tells woman – ‘pay up or go back to jail’. 4. […]

April 23, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

1. If something (e.g. a roof or ceiling) caves in, it collapses and falls into the space below it. Examples of use: a) The tunnel caved in and trapped the miners b) Our conservatory roof caved in under the weight of the snow.   2. To cave in is to stop resisting something and suddenly […]

April 19, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

1. To rip off somebody (or rip somebody off) is to make them pay too much money for something. Informal English. Examples of use: a) The travel company ripped us off. The cottage we booked for our holiday was a wreck. b) Don’t buy a used car from him – he will rip you off. […]

April 18, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

To drum up something is to try and increase interest in something, or support for something.   Examples of use: 1. Our marketing team is drumming up interest in our new product. 2. He’s trying to drum up more email subscribers to his new blog. 3. We drummed up lots of new customers with our […]

April 17, 2011 By Angela Boothroyd

1. To bail out somebody or something (or bail somebody or something out) is to help a person or business in difficulty (especially financial difficulties). Examples of use: a) The government used tax payers’ money to bail out the big banks. b) You must stop wasting money on shoes and jewellery. I can’t keep bailing […]