2010 March | online-english-lessons.eu

March 31, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

April Fools’ Day is celebrated on the 1st April in many countries, including in the UK. It’s also known as All Fools’ Day. April Fools’ Day is traditionally a day to trick people into believing stories that aren’t true, and for playing jokes on people in order to make them laugh, or appear foolish.   […]

March 31, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

If somebody is an April Fool they are the victim of a practical joke played on April Fools’ Day (1st April). Example of use: 1. Her children made an April Fool of her by putting salt in her cup of tea. When someone successfully plays an April Fool trick on somebody they often shout out […]

March 30, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

If something burns down, or someone burns it down, it is completely destroyed by fire. Examples of use: 1. There was a huge fire at the factory and it burned down. 2. He was sent to prison for deliberately burning down the hotel. infinitive burn down present simple burn down and burns down -ing form […]

March 29, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

1. If people or things are spread out, they are not close together. Examples of use: a) The tourists were spread out over the whole beach. b) Her study books were spread out over her desk and all over the office floor.   2. If a group of people spread out they move away from […]

March 29, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

To spell out something (or spell something out) is to explain it in a very clear and detailed way. Examples of use: 1. I don’t understand what you are talking about. Can you spell it out for me? 2. I’m sure I don’t have to spell out how important it is to practise your English […]

March 29, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

To sleep through something is to stay asleep through a noise or activity. Examples of use: 1. The baby slept through the car journey. 2. My father is lucky. He can sleep through any noise. 3. We slept through last night’s storm and woke up this morning to find part of our roof had blown […]

March 29, 2010 By Angela Boothroyd

To speak up for someone or something is to show your support by publicly expressing your opinions. Examples of use: 1. Elise spoke up to defend Alice when she was accused of theft. 2. Minority ethinic groups should be empowered to speak up for themselves. To speak up is also to speak more loudly so […]