2009 December | online-english-lessons.eu

December 20, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

To key in something (or key something in) is to use a keyboard to type information into a computer or into an electronic system. Example of use: I’m making a new online English word search and the first thing I have to do is key in all the words. infinitive – key in present simple […]

December 19, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

To veg out (informal) is to spend time relaxing and doing very little, or be engaged in a mindless activity that does not require one to think much. Example of use: I have a day off at the weekend and I think I might veg out in front of the television all day. Image by […]

December 19, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

I’ll eat my hat is something you say when you are very confident your opinion or judgement about something is correct. Examples of use: 1. I’ll eat my hat if my father doesn’t like his birthday present. 2. It’s very cold today and the weather forecast is for snow, but I’ll eat my hat if […]

December 19, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

To step up something (or step something up) is to do more of an activity, work harder at it, or increase the level or strength of something in order to improve a situation. Examples of use: 1. We’re going to sell out of Christmas puddings long before Christmas if we don’t step up production. 2. […]

December 19, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

To measure up is to be good enough; to have the necessary abilities, skills or qualities. Examples of use: 1. Our office manager has lost her job because her work didn’t measure up. 2. My brother is meeting his girlfriend’s parents today. I hope he measures up to their expectations! infinitive – measure up present […]

December 18, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

To push in (informal) is to rudely move in front of other people in a queue instead of waiting in line. Example of use: In the UK people get very annoyed if others push in at the bus stop or in a shop. infinitive – push in present simple – push in and pushes in […]

December 18, 2009 By Angela Boothroyd

If you phone back somebody (or phone somebody back) you telephone someone who rang you earlier; or you telephone someone for a second time.   Examples of use: 1. Can you phone me back tomorrow? 2. Mrs Patel was in a meeting when I telephoned. I will phone her back later.  3. Phone back this […]